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Ep 874[Ep 875] Thumbs Northeast [1:59:34]
Recorded: Sat, 2024-Mar-16 UTC
Published: Sat, 2024-Mar-16 23:57 UTC
Ep 876

This week on Curmudgeon's Corner, Sam and Ivan discuss lots of obsolete technology, Boeing's real issues, some more Boeing issues that aren't really Boeing's fault, Trump's many many legal issues, and the merits of the 1980 movie Raging Bull. So that's that.

  • (0:00:01-0:04:31) Cold Open
  • (0:04:53-0:35:14) But First
    • Obsolete Technology
    • Movie: Raging Bull (1980)
  • (0:37:13-1:07:32) Boeing Issues
    • Actual Boeing Issues
    • Not Boeings Fault Issues
  • (1:08:34-1:58:02) Trump Legal Stuff
    • SCOTUS 14th Amendment Ruling
    • Trump Bond Payments
    • Some Georgia Charges Dropped
    • New York Delayed Too
    • Willis and Wade
    • Presidential Immunity
    • Documents Case

Automated Transcript


Sam:
[0:00]
Hello mr bow sorry about the delay.

Ivan:
[0:05]
Hello yes delay delay delay tom delay tom delay wasn't he house speaker.

Sam:
[0:15]
He was uh something he wasn't speaker wasn't he yeah he was like the a majority leader or speaker?

Ivan:
[0:26]
Okay, so, okay, now you.

Sam:
[0:29]
He was the majority whip. And majority, he was majority leader under Dennis Haster.

Ivan:
[0:37]
Okay, he was a majority leader. Okay, all right. He wasn't speaker.

Okay, under, under the distinguished. Dennis Haster.

Or not distinguished.

Sam:
[0:47]
Yes.

Ivan:
[0:47]
I think, isn't he in jail or dead? One of the, one of those two. i.

Sam:
[0:51]
Thought we determined he got out i.

Ivan:
[0:54]
See got out no he's still alive i think maybe you're right i think he did get out of jail he was in jail uh indictment, reactions.

Sam:
[1:11]
Arraignment guilty plea.

Ivan:
[1:13]
Sentencing christ this article's way too yeah incarceration was released from federal prison. Okay.

Sam:
[1:24]
13 months of a 15 month sentence.

Ivan:
[1:26]
So it wasn't, I think that was quite light for what he did.

Sam:
[1:33]
Ah, yes. Okay.

Okay. Are we doing our usual or are we picking stuff?

Ivan:
[1:45]
I don't know, whatever, whatever, whatever, whatever, whatever, whatever, whatever you want to pick things or just come bring up things down.

Sam:
[1:57]
We can, we can do our usual. Let's see.

Ivan:
[2:00]
Um, I like we, you know, not like we put down a lot.

Sam:
[2:04]
No, there wasn't a lot of new stuff this week, but I mean, some of them have, you know, I mean.

Ivan:
[2:09]
Stuff happened, but it's not, it's not not like it's more like.

like continuation of stuff, you know, not, not new, new, right.

Sam:
[2:19]
Okay.

Ivan:
[2:19]
New, new, new, new.

Sam:
[2:21]
Good.

Ivan:
[2:22]
So new, new Gary.

Sam:
[2:23]
Good, new, so new.

Ivan:
[2:24]
New.

Sam:
[2:25]
Yes.

Ivan:
[2:26]
What did Sanunu do? I don't remember. Yeah, I know there are multiple Sanunus.

Well, the big Sanunu, not junior, um, the big Sanunu. Oh, I, I think he was pretty fat too.

I can't remember. I think he was, I don't know. John Sanunu. Let's see.

Let's see. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Yeah. He was quite portly. I just looked at the picture.

Yeah. I know he's that governor of New Hampshire. What the hell was he in the.

He was a White House chief of staff for HW. Okay. Yeah.

Sam:
[3:03]
And his son is currently governor of New Hampshire, right?

Ivan:
[3:07]
That may be true. I know he was also governor of New Hampshire.

Sam:
[3:11]
Or Vermont. Is it Vermont?

Ivan:
[3:14]
You know, Sanud, okay, here's a tidbit. I had no idea.

Oh, well, he's not Cuban, but he was born in Havana, Cuba.

But he's not Cuban. It was apparently his parents were visiting Cuba on a business trip, which I find really weird that somebody would be traveling on a business trip when they were nine months pregnant.

Sam:
[3:35]
You are, of course, right about New Hampshire, not Vermont.

Ivan:
[3:39]
Yeah, New Hampshire. Yeah, it was New Hampshire.

Sam:
[3:42]
Both of them.

Ivan:
[3:43]
Both of them yeah yeah they were both new hampshire covered yeah yeah anyway all right okay we're wait is.

Sam:
[3:51]
That enough of like politicians from the 80s.

Ivan:
[3:55]
Mid-level politicians.

Sam:
[3:56]
From the 80s.

Ivan:
[3:57]
Mid-level yes because you're not really going after any heavy hitters okay well wait hastert was okay yeah 2000s it was i was talking about.

Sam:
[4:09]
The sununu's in this case but yes.

Ivan:
[4:11]
Well, yeah, but you know, I mean, well.

Sam:
[4:15]
I guess the current Sununu is not from the eighties. The old Sununu was.

Ivan:
[4:19]
Yes. True.

What's he doing to Adam? Anyway. All right, let's move.

Sam:
[4:27]
Can we just start?

Ivan:
[4:29]
Yeah, sure.

Sam:
[4:30]
Here we go.

Ivan:
[4:30]
Yeah.

Sam:
[4:53]
Welcome to Curmudgeon's Corner for Saturday, March 16th, 2024.

It's just before 3 UTC as we're starting to record. I am Sam Minter.

Yvonne Bo is here. Hello, Yvonne.

Ivan:
[5:07]
Hello. Have you been hit by this reference?

I've heard people make the comment, this is younger people.

Sam:
[5:19]
Younger people, yes. younger people.

Ivan:
[5:21]
Say oh yeah you know that movie's from the 1900s.

Sam:
[5:24]
I i have i have heard these things i don't i i don't know how much i've heard it in person you know i i heard.

Ivan:
[5:32]
Somebody say it i was like oh fuck you 1900s.

Sam:
[5:39]
It's accurate it.

Ivan:
[5:42]
Is yes it is it.

Sam:
[5:44]
Is it's ancient ancient history and i i i love like you know one of the genres of videos on the potentially to be banned tiktok that i sometimes enjoy are younger kids interacting with like technology from when we were kids and trying to figure out what the hell it is and how to work it and stuff it's rather amusing, you know a rotary phone for instance oh oh yeah or or like a cassette walkman well.

Ivan:
[6:17]
You know to be fair the rotor the rotary phone was like being phased out as we were as we were you know growing up.

Sam:
[6:26]
Of course i've i've i remember my first push button phone and being excited about it but i me too yeah but but i but you know the kids are confused by those too you know because there's no like the.

Ivan:
[6:40]
Thing is that right because you pick up and there's a tone and then you dial and they're.

Sam:
[6:45]
Like as opposed to pick a dialing.

Ivan:
[6:47]
Number and then hitting send yeah.

Sam:
[6:49]
Yes or or or more to the point you pick the person you want to call and you hit them well yeah that's the actual phone number is kind of anachronistic at this point as well yeah.

Ivan:
[7:00]
Yeah yeah you know and and And as we were talking before the show, we were talking about old 1900s politicians.

So when I went to the Wikipedia page for John Sununu, he has a PC back there in that picture.

That is just, I mean, I'm pretty sure it doesn't even have a hard drive. Okay.

It looks like, from what I can see, it's five and one quarter inch floppies.

it's not even three and a half inch it's a black and white screen it's a monochrome screen at least yeah it's one of those green ones yeah yeah you know that so computers are real yes.

Sam:
[7:46]
They they should absolutely bring those back green on black text only.

Ivan:
[7:51]
Yes yes look i i i love that i love that i.

Sam:
[8:00]
Thought they looked so cool.

Ivan:
[8:01]
Listen i mean that was that was that was the shit i mean i loved that i mean you know that was that was my that was my thing man especially.

Sam:
[8:14]
The ones where it was really bright green and really black black.

Ivan:
[8:19]
Yes yes yes you know we i used these So one of them was these Raytheon PTS100 terminals that were the one for the computer reservation system, you know, that we had at the travel agency.

And those were exactly that. And they had, like, man, the keyboard was loud.

You know, those were, like, real keys.

Sam:
[8:43]
The big, wacky keyboards.

Ivan:
[8:45]
Oh, yeah. And then we got some IBM terminals, okay, as well.

Well, I had and a VTO, the VT 100. OK.

Sam:
[8:55]
Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah.

Ivan:
[8:57]
Man, those also were really good. I will say that I really liked the IBM terminals.

The keyboard on those is a mechanical keyboard that is everybody thinks is super loud, but I'll tell you what, that was a really nice keyboard to work on.

And I really liked those very much.

So yeah, I, I, I mean, yeah, bring back the green screens. Yeah.

I'm sure that'll confuse a lot of people.

Sam:
[9:31]
Exactly. anyway so we're going to do our usual thing if you guys can't tell uh unlike last week where i was on my own and you know because the last time i was traveling which is the weird thing so like yeah i was like bizarre yvonne sent me a clip and i inserted that but i wasn't about to ask like for a substitute co-host because it wasn't like yvonne wasn't available it was more like i wasn't available so it was weird and i.

Ivan:
[9:57]
Said and i sent you a clip.

Sam:
[9:59]
Yeah and i used the clip you know you know and i was there for a memorial service so i included the eulogy too so that was kind of interesting yeah yeah yeah um but you know so but we're back we're back so we're going to do our usual which means we're going to go by the way first yeah terminals.

Ivan:
[10:17]
That are that i was using.

Sam:
[10:18]
Their ibm.

Ivan:
[10:19]
3486 terminals okay.

Sam:
[10:22]
Okay all right yes yeah those.

Ivan:
[10:24]
Were so we bought a whole bunch of those okay for our store those are really cool i mean and that and they and you could plug in the ps2 i i liked i will say the ps2 keyboard okay from ibm okay the ps2 i okay ibm ps2s those were you know ibm's trying to muscle out the clones that was their attempt unsuccessful, but the keyboards are cool. I'll tell you what.

Sam:
[11:00]
You know you you can still get like no i saw a keyboard i got.

Ivan:
[11:04]
My my nephew got one that's right.

Sam:
[11:06]
Yeah yeah yeah i mean you there are people who are like connoisseurs of mechanical keyboards and will spend lots of money on really fancy ones i.

Ivan:
[11:16]
Think the problem is like right now where i am that the look i i as much as i like it i'm on so many zoom calls that it's just.

Sam:
[11:26]
Not a good idea.

Ivan:
[11:27]
Yeah they're laughing.

Sam:
[11:28]
Well you know i've found like you know i have some nostalgia for the old mechanical keyboards but every time i've actually had an opportunity to like touch one and do stuff with it i i don't feel like i could use it on a regular basis anymore i'm now so used to sort of the thin like keyboards that without very much travel that aren't loud and i like them i you You know, I have nostalgia for the other kind, but I don't actually feel like I want to use them on a regular basis.

Ivan:
[12:00]
No, I agree. I agree. So anyway, you know.

Sam:
[12:04]
The new technology actually is better in lots of ways.

Ivan:
[12:08]
Yeah. Yes, it is. Okay. And it's just, it's one of those things where, I mean, look, the loud noise was cool, but at the same time, I know it drove a lot of people nuts.

Sam:
[12:23]
And also just like it takes like more energy to push the key down farther.

Ivan:
[12:29]
Oh yeah like oh yeah i'm.

Sam:
[12:31]
Gonna get tired from all that exercise.

Ivan:
[12:33]
Well look it wasn't as bad as for example we we still had i remember at our store where we we had a mechanical typewriter yes of course and i mean.

There was a couple of people at the store who, even though we had the evolution at the pharmacy counter, went from mechanical keyboard to electric typewriter to, you know, from, I mean, I'm a mechanical typewriter to electric typewriter to then to a computer with a printer, a dock matrix printer at the time.

Okay. But I remember it's like, look, there were some people that you were not never going to get.

to use we could get them to use the electronic typewriter okay and i mean there was just no way in hell and so we always had that it was an adler i remember mechanical key mechanical typewriter and sometimes when the other if i had to use a typewriter and the other ones were busy i had to use it i'll let you tell you something that took a lot of effort because you really had had to push those damn keys down hard to get that damn thing to print, okay?

And it was loud.

Yeah, you know? Hell, we even had a mechanical cash register.

It was like you, it had these buttons where you, so say you were going to do $135.

There was a row of hundreds, 100, 200, 300, and then 30s.

And then, so you would go, you know, you, you press the amount of the hunt a hundred and then you would press the 30 and then you would press, you had to roll one through five of the five.

And then you got to the sense where you would pick the 25, you know, the 20 set, whatever. then the five and then you would have to pull a crank to get.

Sam:
[14:37]
That to go now.

Ivan:
[14:39]
That was that was something else i'll tell you.

Sam:
[14:43]
Okay so it i i never even finished the agenda we're doing but first oh and then oh and then we are going to do more newsy topics but we will pick them as we go so i guess you know people who listen to the show know this already it's what we do all the time So is your but first obsolete technology?

Do you want to talk more about that or do you have something else in mind?

Ivan:
[15:06]
Do I have something else in mind? Do I have something else in mind?

I don't know. I don't think so.

I don't know.

Not really.

Sam:
[15:21]
Is there any more obsolete technology you want to speak of then?

Ivan:
[15:25]
More obsolete technology that we can talk about? Well, you know, today we're talking about, you know, talking about obsolete technology.

I joined this little, there's a Facebook group, Sony Vintage Equipment. Okay.

Okay. And so a lot of people posting pictures of like very old Sony equipment that they have at home.

We're talking, I was looking at one obsolete technology, for example, mini disc players.

Now, the mini disc format was something that was.

they want i remember the.

Sam:
[15:59]
Existence of this but i never had one i.

Ivan:
[16:02]
Never had i never had one either okay and so you know but there's a lot of people with some of those players still around that still work um and i and i remember that i mean that was like they were trying to use that as a replacement of the cd in part is a lot more portable because the original you know the cd players were portable to to to an extent okay and i remember that we had i mean my father bought the first the first one that was a portable so sony d5 okay and we had it now the one thing about it well it was it was bulky that we the battery pack for that first one was stupid i mean this was was was portable but i mean it was like if you remember the old original portable computers like a k-pro something like that there was like a briefcase well this my dad.

Sam:
[16:58]
Had a k-pro too i loved that thing.

Ivan:
[17:00]
I was really.

Sam:
[17:01]
Upset at one point when i found out he got rid of it i was like i would have taken that damn thing but.

Ivan:
[17:07]
So so so you know so this was kind of like in that vein not as bad but because the thing is it needed about six d batteries for it to be powered okay d batteries Batteries are heavy and you had to put the thing inside this huge plastic sleeve that you could, okay, you could carry it. Okay. It was like a few pounds.

It was lighter than a laptop, say two, three pounds, but that wasn't exactly very portable.

Okay. It wasn't like you, you could like go exercise with this. Okay.

Now, the one thing is that they didn't have a, a buffer at that time for the lasers.

But what they did, it was very shock-mounted. And it really resisted bumps and whatever.

But if you really hit it, what happened was that the laser just went off, whatever, and it skipped into somewhere else on the song.

Then later on, Sony went, well, we need to make this cheaper. We'll build a buffer.

And they started making them a lot cheaper than that. And so the one thing that happened was, oh, because we got the buffer, they got rid of a lot of the isolation from the bumps.

so what happened was that it was always constantly in the buffer it was annoying i i found it it was like that but but so so that's why sony went to first they tried a consumer dat okay digital audio tape well that didn't go very well okay and so then they launched the mini disc thing and the mini disc did sell a lot more than that because that as a consumer product was a disaster okay but but yeah but that also didn't fly well and in the end mp3 players came out the ipod came out and then the rest is history i mean we went you know to digital music i mean you know so that was that was pretty much it but but i i now there's some people sharing you know how they are still you know they have their i had a portable that player that i used a lot um and i i, i sold that one i kept that i kept the tabletop one yes.

Sam:
[19:18]
For me in case at some point i find the old curmudgeons corner tapes from when we were in college yes because they about half of them were recorded on dat.

Ivan:
[19:27]
So i'm hoping i mean i did see a lot of people with with with with the machines that are still working i i saw one guy that basically because right now those are 30 years old that for the portable ones he he bought like five or six so he could cannibalize parts, okay and and and repair them and like keep them going i know that mine was like i mean i sold it and it was like 15 years old it still worked like a charm i know i tried the one that i've got here and i played music on it it was still playing beautiful so so that one's still working i haven't fired it up in a while probably fire it up just to make sure everything's okay although.

Sam:
[20:05]
Although like sort of just keeping it in isolation in pristine, in a pristine environment.

Ivan:
[20:11]
It is absolutely in, it's absolutely in pristine condition. Yes.

There's no problem about that. Yes.

Sam:
[20:17]
Someday I will either find those tapes or determine that like my moving people, like sometime when I changed houses through the crop in the trash.

Ivan:
[20:26]
Or I'll find them after you die. I'll go and I'll decide. Yeah, I'll go and I'm like, Brandy. Yeah.

Okay. okay, my last wit, I need to, I got to, you know, go rummage through here.

Sam:
[20:41]
Yes. Anyway, enough obsolete technology.

Ivan:
[20:45]
Enough obsolete technology, yes.

Sam:
[20:47]
Shall I do another movie?

Ivan:
[20:49]
Well, you still got a whole bunch to go through, I'll tell you what.

Sam:
[20:51]
Oh, lots, lots and lots to catch up on. And like, I skipped a couple of weeks without doing one, so.

Ivan:
[20:57]
They're piling up.

Sam:
[20:59]
Yeah, piling up. Okay, where did I put it? I brought up, I have the, the, the, my, the.

Ivan:
[21:05]
Now one thing I don't know that I meant, did I mention on the show? Howard, the duck.

Sam:
[21:11]
Yes. And let me just say, I'm not going to do Howard, the duck right now, but I will tell this story because. Yeah.

What happened is we Yvonne, like the last show he was physically on with me like two weeks ago.

Ivan:
[21:27]
Yeah. We talked about terrible movies and.

Sam:
[21:30]
He mentioned terrible movies and he mentioned how horrible, horrible Howard, the duck was.

And like two days later I go and I use my random mechanism to pick a movie with, to watch with the, with Alex.

And we ended up with Howard, the fucking duck.

Ivan:
[21:47]
Okay.

Sam:
[21:48]
Now, Now, to be slightly more specific, we pulled a category which was the oldest Marvel movie we haven't watched yet, and Howard the Duck is actually a Marvel movie.

Ivan:
[21:59]
Howard the Duck is a Marvel movie?

Sam:
[22:01]
Yes. It's not MCU, but Howard the Duck was a Marvel comic.

Ivan:
[22:06]
Okay.

Sam:
[22:07]
And there were some older ones, but it gets weird when you get earlier than that.

I mean, there's Marvel stuff going back to the 1940s.

Okay. But, but there's some I couldn't find online and anywhere.

And some are like they're, they're movie length, but they were really pilots for TV shows.

So do you count it as a TV show or do you count it as a movie?

There was an old captain America cereal, which I usually count as a TV show, but I was rolling for a movie right now.

Anyway, the clearest, easiest, oldest movie was Howard the duck.

And so Alex and I watched Howard the duck and someday I will get to it and I will talk about it.

Ivan:
[22:48]
I'm looking at the comics of Howard Duck.

I got to say, I had no idea that it was. He looks like a very angry Donald Duck.

Sam:
[23:00]
An angry Donald Duck.

Ivan:
[23:02]
Yes. That's my impression of him.

I mean, I see it's a Donald Duck with a cigar in his mouth and a suit.

Sam:
[23:14]
Yeah. Yeah.

So anyway, I will eventually talk about Howard the Duck, the movie when I get to it in order.

But today's movie from the AFI list that I'm still working my way through, number 24 from the original top 100 movies of the first hundred years of movies was Raging Bull from 1980.

Ivan:
[23:38]
You know, I must say, I don't know if I've ever watched Raging Bull.

I know what it's about but.

Sam:
[23:48]
I'm not sure.

Ivan:
[23:48]
If I ever watched it.

Sam:
[23:51]
And let me Robert De Niro.

Ivan:
[23:57]
If I remember correctly.

Sam:
[23:58]
Yes Robert Robert De Niro was in it it's a Martin Scorsese movie Joe Pesci's in it too, you know and they were young enough that I was sort of it took me a little while to realize that that was them, but cause this is another case where like we now have in our heads, these actors when they were a little bit older, but I am vacillating between some thumb sideways and thumbs up.

I, I think I'll give it a thumbs up in the end.

I usually don't like, like this sort of it's 1980, but it still has a black and white.

Ivan:
[24:40]
Right?

Sam:
[24:41]
Was it?

Ivan:
[24:42]
Yeah, I think so.

Sam:
[24:44]
I think though, I think most of it was black and white.

Ivan:
[24:47]
Yeah, most of it was black and white.

Sam:
[24:49]
But not all. Like there was, there was, I think there was like strategic use of color in a couple places.

Ivan:
[24:57]
But it was mostly a black and white movie, which was unorthodox for, for the time.

Sam:
[25:02]
Yeah. And maybe I'm wrong about that, but I seem to remember, I don't know.

I may be making shit up. I, I thought like there were some places where like some blood was actually red, but everything else was, I don't know. I, anyway.

Da da da. Yeah. Okay. Yeah.

Yes. Uh, two, blah, blah, blah. Blood on the ropes.

Anyway, I don't know.

Bottom line. Like, I think I'm going to give it a thumbs up. This is 1980, but what I was going to say is it has a lot of things in common with sort of the gritty 1970s films that I tend not to like, that have sort of lots of very, very flawed characters that aren't very sympathetic, that do all kinds of things that are like, why the fuck are they doing that?

That makes no sense. That's self-destructive, whatever.

But I, it, it grew on me as I watched it, I think.

And I got like, I got sucked into it in a way that some of those others, 1970s movies.

I don't, I shouldn't say other 1970s. Again, it was 1980, but 1980 is.

Ivan:
[26:18]
Yeah. It was like, it was filmed in the seventies.

Sam:
[26:20]
It was, it's, it's, it's right next to the seventies, you know? Um.

But yeah, it's a, it's about the career of a boxer and the boxer, you know, is as, as boxing often was, was sort of adjacent to some mob stuff that was going on as well.

And, you know, you've got some things between him, his wife, his friend, blah, blah, blah.

Ivan:
[26:43]
And I definitely did not watch this movie is the one thing that I'm noticing.

I will say one thing. I just, I was in the Wikipedia page and I noticed this very interesting tidbit about the movie.

Sam:
[26:54]
Okay.

Ivan:
[26:55]
According to Scorsese, production of the film was then closed down for around four months, with the entire crew being paid, so De Niro could go on a binge-eating trip around northern Italy and France.

france when he did come back to the united states and weight has increased from 145 to 215 pounds okay now.

Sam:
[27:28]
Did they do that in purpose for him to film the end of the movie.

Ivan:
[27:32]
When he was a much.

Sam:
[27:32]
Older bigger yeah.

Ivan:
[27:33]
Yes the scenes with the heftier jake lamotta which include announcing his retirement from boxing and lamotta ending up in a florida cell were completed while approaching christmas 79 between seven and eight weeks later so as not to aggravate the health issues which are already affecting the neuros posture breathing and talking talk.

Sam:
[27:53]
About doing stuff for the park.

Ivan:
[27:55]
Holy shit yeah i mean i do i remember i remember that he was very much into it i didn't realize i mean holy crap i mean i i mean 70 70 pounds over four months to gain i mean sounds enticing But I was.

Sam:
[28:13]
Going to say, Yvonne, you should try to beat that record.

Start on it tomorrow. See what you can do.

Ivan:
[28:21]
I i don't i don't think i could do it i don't i don't think i could do it i i really don't think i could do it yeah i mean that takes a lot of gorging.

Sam:
[28:38]
And of course like undoing it is even harder.

Ivan:
[28:42]
Yeah but he did i mean so obviously you know i mean he did i wonder how old like de niro was when he did that i mean this is 1979 79 so he's born in 43 so what he was mid 30s okay so he's younger at least, at least he was in his 30s it's not like he did this at like our age at age 50 something you know jeez right yeah i mean i could see that i mean look if i'm getting paid you know like a few million bucks and you're telling me that i gotta go on a four-month eating and drinking binge inch to gain 70 pounds for for that i'm like okay all right let's see how we're gonna do this holy shit anyway.

Sam:
[29:32]
Even though this typically isn't the kind of movie i enjoy i it did suck me in i like you know i i i hesitate in these kinds of movies like with the words i use did i like it i'm not sure I liked it but I was sucked in I it.

Ivan:
[29:52]
Was well made.

Sam:
[29:54]
I enjoyed it I felt for what was going on I was so I guess I did like it but it's not like.

Yeah. There's some movies that are just fun. This is not a fun movie.

It's also not like a super, super depressing movie either.

Although there's some parts that are like cringy because of what's happening and you're like, this is not good, but, but yeah, it was a good movie.

And it, it sort of, I see it got mixed reviews at the time, but you know, AFI put it in there.

you know the the original list had it at 24 apparently in the revised list they bumped it up even higher to like fourth but um you know and yeah like so it was yeah it went up 20 spots between 1998's version of the list and 2007's version of the list like i can't imagine putting putting it at number four in my own personal list, but I could appreciate the artistry in this thing. It's worth watching.

So like if you've never watched it, you know, it's worth watching, but you, you have to have the right mindset for like, this is one of those, you know, semi serious, pay attention to it.

Kind of movies, not like you're going to have like a fun two hours watching something mindless, you know, but yeah. Yeah, so there you go. Raging Bull.

Ivan:
[31:27]
Raging Bull. Okay. All right. So we got a thumbs up. Okay.

Sam:
[31:32]
Thumbs up. Although, again, it was barely a thumbs up. I was going back and forth between sideways and up.

But, you know, so thumbs diagonal, thumbs northeast.

I don't know. Something.

Ivan:
[31:46]
Northwest could be.

Sam:
[31:47]
Northwest. Yeah. North. Yeah. Something.

Ivan:
[31:50]
Of course, actually, we're pointing it up into the sky. So that's neither.

Sam:
[31:54]
True true i don't.

Ivan:
[31:57]
Know it's some kind of like a celestial direction that you could.

Sam:
[32:01]
You know somebody posted the other day about there's like an app you can download that for your phone that points to galactic north okay.

Ivan:
[32:10]
Yeah that's what i was thinking about okay.

Sam:
[32:13]
Yeah so which of course changes as the earth rotates well right i figure yeah yeah yeah i i downloaded this thing i forgot oh galactic compass it's called galactic compass okay and like see here here like right now where i am it's okay so okay so.

Ivan:
[32:29]
Basically you we have to go like oh this is confusing because it's a thumbs up but we have to do it down.

Sam:
[32:35]
Yeah because if we were going to point towards galactic well i wait no wait.

Ivan:
[32:40]
No oh wait.

Sam:
[32:41]
Down for me yvonne you're on a a different part of the planet it's going to be a different direction for you oh fuck.

Ivan:
[32:47]
Me jesus christ now i gotta get this app.

Sam:
[32:53]
Yeah so basically the galactic center for me right now is 26 000 light years down for me in seattle at the time we're recording no time yeah we.

Ivan:
[33:06]
You know it's like walk in the park, now.

Sam:
[33:13]
You're not that far on the planet for me so it's probably basically down just a little okay okay.

Ivan:
[33:20]
Okay so yeah it is still.

Sam:
[33:24]
Mostly down mostly down yeah yeah it's.

Ivan:
[33:28]
A little angled but i gotta go like yeah like that yeah so.

Sam:
[33:33]
Although i think i don't know if they've updated it originally when i first did it they they were like the arrow is only accurate if you actually actually put the iPhone down flat.

Ivan:
[33:45]
Okay.

Sam:
[33:45]
But I think from the look of it, they've fixed that since then.

Ivan:
[33:49]
All right.

Sam:
[33:49]
So you set it flat.

Ivan:
[33:53]
Okay. Yeah. It's kind of like angled there that way.

Sam:
[33:56]
Yeah. But it looked like when I pick it up, it looks like it.

Anyway, folks, you can't see this, but you can download the app.

It's an iPhone app. I don't know if there's an Android version, but it's called a galactic compass. There you go.

Ivan:
[34:08]
All right. Just in case you need to find a galactic center of the universe.

Sam:
[34:12]
Of the galaxy not not not the universe that's a whole different thing so.

Ivan:
[34:17]
The galaxy the galaxy not the universe that our galaxy yeah that's it yeah don't shit what am i yeah the galaxy yes.

Sam:
[34:23]
And there really isn't a center of the universe no.

Ivan:
[34:25]
I i just i realized that that was stupid but i just said yeah so the galaxy yes.

Sam:
[34:30]
Except of course me because i am the center of the universe oh.

Ivan:
[34:34]
Oh oh well gee wow i'm so privileged.

Sam:
[34:40]
I know.

Ivan:
[34:42]
I always keep great company.

Sam:
[34:44]
Yeah absolutely okay galactic center raging bull thumbs somewhere between sideways and up there you go with that are you ready to take a break and then do newsier stuff sure.

Ivan:
[34:59]
Newsy newsy frothy this.

Sam:
[35:03]
First break was actually originally going to be last week but i actually held on to it to do it with you here because it's another apple dream oh.

Ivan:
[35:11]
Great now he changed it.

Break:
[35:16]
Is that some sort of building.

And the top was higher than the bottom. I know that sounds like it's normally true, but it was one of these buildings where the ground is sloped.

So at the bottom of the building, the ground floor is low and the upper building is upper floor.

But anyway, I was meeting someone there who was going to be doing something.

And it is rapidly leaving in my mind what in the world for.

But I knew they were going to be meeting my dad at the bottom because my dad was coming to see me but this person was going to be meeting them and I guess bringing them to me and I was explaining to them something about what was involved in that but then a third person came and said oh we're gonna go but instead of going down through the building to meet him and bring him up we were going to go around the building and down on the sidewalk so, the three of us went down on the sidewalk to get my dad and then we got him and then there was something with like white pillars and some arches and i guess my dad was happy that we were there, but then there were pillows and arches.

And then someone came through the room and I woke up and I froze so that they wouldn't see me and I waited for them to come through again and then they left, and by that time I had forgotten most of the details and what I said might not even be right or something.

Sam:
[37:14]
Well there you go.

Ivan:
[37:15]
Wow okay you know it kind of like reminded me i you know so recently i've been going to san juan more frequently than i've haven't jeez decades and you know you're talking about the the building being high or low in one place and sloped and whatnot and florida is very flat you you lived here for a while florida is extremely flat where.

Sam:
[37:41]
Whereas what i described in that dream.

Ivan:
[37:44]
Right like.

Sam:
[37:45]
It's very common here in seattle.

Ivan:
[37:46]
It's yeah yeah big hills yeah and.

Sam:
[37:49]
So you've got cases where on one side of the building like the ground is at the first floor and on the other side of the building the ground is at the fifth floor or something.

Ivan:
[37:58]
And that was that that's the thing about san juan san juan is not you know it's very hilly it's not it's not flat and so i was I was going to an office and, you know, for a meeting and I mean, it's just the, everything is just so sloped and I was just, you know, it's just kind of weird.

I'm walking around this city where everything is not sloped and, and I, I mean, I will say that, you know, probably city that I walked the most to go to meetings, probably New York city, um, I had to navigate New York city a lot for meetings and New York city is also so flat so it's really weird every time i go to san juan i'm trying to navigate between streets and whatnot and i and i realize you know i'm from there but it's just it's been so long that i'm not going it's like everything is just so hilly like that so so yeah i i know that that feeling where on one side it's like you know i actually in guatemala city was it was like that too where where I was in a place where on one side, the lobby of the hotel was like three floors higher than the, Then the other side of the hotel where I was, it was like three stories lower.

So, so yeah. So interesting anyway. So.

Sam:
[39:17]
Okay. Time for newsy topics.

Ivan:
[39:19]
News. The news. The news. The news. The news. The news. The news. The news breaks.

We fix it. Okay. All right.

Well, I'm going to talk a little bit about everybody freaking out about Boeing airplanes like right now.

Sam:
[39:37]
Yeah. Yeah, there was another one in the news just like an hour ago or something.

Ivan:
[39:41]
An hour?

Sam:
[39:43]
Well, earlier today, let's say.

Ivan:
[39:46]
There was one earlier today where some door fell off a 737.

Sam:
[39:49]
Yeah, another, wait, a 747?

Ivan:
[39:52]
No, a 737-800, yeah, on United.

Sam:
[39:56]
Okay, that sounds right.

Ivan:
[39:57]
Look, I think there are, I want to separate two things, okay?

The issues that Boeing is having, which are real, with developing their airplanes, with quality control and manufacturing and other things.

These are things that are not new, but they got worse with what they had happen with the 737 MAX.

max um and just if nobody remembers what would happen with the 737 max was just a newer model of 737 a plane that's been built for decades and decades but heavily modified but it's still you know based on the original airframe was that in order to accommodate bigger engines they added certain software to the flight management system to do certain actions automatically in order to to try to, in order to keep the plane safe, to stabilize the plane, okay, in certain situations.

Sam:
[41:04]
Right.

Ivan:
[41:05]
And Boeing aircraft never really had that feature.

And one thing that they were trying to tell all their customers was, oh, you can take your pilots from 737-800s and put them on the MAX and you don't need to recertify them.

And so they didn't document any of that, which was idiotic, or how the system worked or what to do in case of failure, because they were like thinking, oh, no, this thing's going to be transparent, nothing's going to happen.

Unfortunately, what it did is that the system did have issues and glitches, and it wound up crashing a number of planes.

And it was just something that was just.

Sam:
[41:42]
And in some cases, by the way, there was the documentation issue.

But even with pilots that were possible.

Ivan:
[41:51]
Oh, the software was defective. Oh, yeah, the software was defective.

It would do things that were wrong, period.

Sam:
[41:58]
Yeah, so there were two things. things. One, they didn't train the pilots, so they had no idea what was going on when this started.

And second, even if they were well trained, the software could put them into impossible situations.

Ivan:
[42:11]
Exactly. Yeah. So it was those two things at the same time. Okay.

So, so that was just idiotic. I mean, and, and, And so you had that issue. But prior to that, they had a number of quality control issues with the 787.

Look, aircraft programs have delays in terms of testing and certification.

And the 787 was delivered many years late.

There were a lot of issues in terms of the manufacturing quality of the 787s that it took a significant amount of time to fix.

They had an issue for about a year that led to a grounding of almost all 787s because of lithium ion batteries that they had chosen to put on the planes that kept catching fire.

Sam:
[43:02]
You always want that.

Ivan:
[43:04]
Yeah, and that they had not really built a proper system to encase those batteries just in case it was a runaway failure.

and you know and and so the 787 didn't get up get off to a clean start and and now the issue has been also that they were supposed to launch a replacement for this triple seven called the triple seven x and that plane's been delayed forever okay because when they started auditing everything that boeing had been doing related to the max and they checked all the work done to to launch the 777-X, I mean, it wound up delaying.

They are now at least five years late for delivery of the first aircraft.

Boeing, at one point, in order to shed costs, had outsourced a lot of the manufacturing to third parties.

They have a plant in South Carolina that they are outsourcing certain work.

They have this other one from Spirit Aerosystems.

And one of the other things about when you...

decouple into that many subcontractors that work then making sure that everything got done properly and assembling it becomes a more of a problem okay at this point so but but they've been dealing with these issues for for for for many years and it's led to huge delays it's led to order cancellations customers have gotten pissed united like right now canceled a whole whole bunch of orders because there was a another variant of the max the max 10 that was supposed to come out and they you know they haven't been able to to to to launch that plane now having said all of that okay yeah the reality is that most of the issues that we're seeing right now in the news are.

Are more related to maintenance and just shit that sometimes happens with airplanes.

Because the problem is that right now, Boeing is under a lot more scrutiny because of all the stuff that's been happening recently.

And so now it's like they're under a microscope.

So anything that happens is like... I mean, for example, they have this thing with like a triple seven that a wheel fell off.

Sam:
[45:36]
Okay.

Ivan:
[45:36]
Look, the whole thing with the wheel is, The wheel apparently was old. It should have been replaced already.

And it just broke. It wasn't poorly assembled. It wasn't poorly designed.

It's just, it's a 20 plus year old airplane. And I guess some, uh, an inspection wasn't properly done on the wheel and it failed.

That's it. You know, it's a fucking wheel. Okay. It's not, you know, that's all that happened. Okay.

Sam:
[46:05]
And what you're saying in that particular case, what you're saying is that one's not Boeing's fault. The airline or whoever owned it, like didn't inspect properly, didn't do keep up with maintenance.

So it's not really Boeing's fault in that situation. Right.

Ivan:
[46:19]
There was a, there was a triple seven recently that coming out of Sydney had a hydraulic failure.

Well, look, hydraulic failures. Look, I've been on airplanes with like that have had, you know, it's, it's something that happens. Okay.

Look, I mean, you know, a part failed.

They have redundancy and they have procedures for it.

well shit we have this they went through it plane came back safely whatever and i think that if this had happened like about five years ago nobody six years ago nobody would have even like you know plane had you know whatever shit happens so so none of these are like related to, like the stuff that really set off what happened recently was just just just look they had this 737 max 9 that was put into service and apparently at the factory somebody just you know to do some work and remove this this this plug i was supposed to cover up this hole on the plane and they put the fucking screws back in but also at the same time it's been been reported that the damn airline they knew something was fucking wrong with the damn plane and they had decided to ah we're still gonna fly it anyway.

Sam:
[47:39]
Right.

Ivan:
[47:40]
Yeah. And, you know, and I will say that I think that when something happens to the airplane accidents get a lot of visibility, they're very, you know, when a plane crashes, it's like very noticeable. Okay.

Sam:
[47:58]
Well, because it's so rare.

Ivan:
[48:00]
It's so rare. Right.

Sam:
[48:02]
I mean, this is the honest truth is like however many millions of fucking flights there are all the time. Right.

Ivan:
[48:08]
Right now, there's like 20,000 planes in the air at the same time, approximately.

Sam:
[48:13]
Yeah. I mean, and, you know, it's sort of like, yeah.

So when something catastrophic happens, it makes international headlines.

Ivan:
[48:24]
Yeah. And none of these are, and that's the one thing, but most of these incidents that we're talking about were not catastrophic.

I mean, nobody got hurt. Nobody died. It's just, you know, yeah, they were like scary. you know the one thing that just happened the thing with this 787 that just uh that that what happened with.

Sam:
[48:41]
The one today.

Ivan:
[48:41]
Okay so the one today they just had a door but they just had a panel that fell off 737 okay probably i mean just probably outside so it wasn't like it wasn't like.

Sam:
[48:51]
The door plug.

Ivan:
[48:52]
Yeah no it was just off and on the door.

Sam:
[48:54]
Plug by the way yes no no one died but they were damn lucky you know.

Ivan:
[48:58]
Well if somebody.

Sam:
[49:00]
Had been in the window seat you know.

Ivan:
[49:02]
Well yes if If somebody had been at that seat and they had not been belted, okay, all right, they may – yes, that may have happened, which is what happened with this incident with the 787 where it took a dive.

Well, it was flying from Australia to – getting close to New Zealand.

It was from the airline to Chile where it took a nosedive, and 50 people got hurt.

50 people got hurt, unfortunately, because there were crews that weren't wearing their damn seat belts, okay?

Sam:
[49:31]
Right.

Ivan:
[49:32]
But it came out, it happened, and apparently...

There had been service bulletin issued that there's a, there's a switch in the back of the, of the seats. Okay.

That, that, that switch is for, to move the seat so somebody can get it back.

Sam:
[49:50]
Of the seat in the cockpit.

Ivan:
[49:51]
In the cockpit, in the cockpit. Okay. And the pilot seat, there's a little, there's a little, there's a little switch back there to be able to move the seat so you can get in and get out easier. Okay.

apparently there there had been a bulletin by boeing because apparently sometimes that switch get loose and the seat might be moved accident okay okay and apparently the the pilot was getting his meal okay and a flight attendant walked up to the to the to the to the to the seat and apparently put their hand on the cover of the switch which it has a cover so this doesn't happen but if the switch got loose and you put the hand on the cover it would still trigger moving the seat and so apparently when she put her hand down to give the food tray to the to the pilot it pushed the seat forward and the pilot inadvertently pushed the damn stick forward.

Um you know just one of those dumb things you know that that happens which by the way has happened at other times there was there was there was an incident that was like worse about seven or eight years ago on an airbus 330 that was that there was a there was a passenger plane that was used by the by the royal air force in the uk where one of the pilots inadvertently had had put a camera on the side of the seat.

Sam:
[51:23]
Okay?

Ivan:
[51:24]
And he went and he pushed the seat forward and didn't realize that the armrest of the damn seat pushed the stick forward and it caused the plane to go into a plunge, okay?

It scared the shit out of everybody and then they were struggling to get out of the plunge because the fucking camera was jammed with the seat pushed forward.

And so, you know, they didn't understand what the fuck is going on.

He's trying to pull back on the stick.

He can't do it. The other guy is trying to pull back on the stick.

The stupid play's not responding because that seat's got to jam, got the stick jammed forward.

Some point they realized what the fuck happened, was able to get control of the fucking play and then, like, stabilize it.

by the way i believe that pilot got fired okay over this because he shouldn't have he should have had his stuff secured better uh better secured better yeah uh but but it's just one of those you know it's listen that incident was way worse than this one the thing is boeing is getting so much scrutiny right now that and all this shit is happening and people are like you know freaking out but that one was like man that plunge was worse i think they went down over 10 15 000 feet okay and i mean just imagine just you're in the fucking plane this fucking thing is pointed down and it just keeps going and everybody in i mean in the back is like experiencing these g's and this is not stopping okay and then all of a sudden when it recovered it went like a fucking and rock it all the way in the other fucking direction.

Everybody wanted to press into the fucking seats.

Okay, and it was just nuts. Okay?

Nobody got hurt. Okay, thank you. No, some people did get hurt, like, the same as this.

Some people their seatbelts or whatever, and that stuff happened, but shit, I mean, you know, it's just what, you know, look, I go, and I'm like, sometimes when something happens to, One of these aircraft manufacturers, then a lot of attention gets paid to, oh my God, look, another, another, another Airbus had something happen. I mean, I mean, shit.

I still remember the one fucking year I was in Brazil that we had, I had two fucking Airbus planes crash.

Okay. They had an A320 that went crashed at the fucking local airport, killed everybody on board.

and we had the a330 that fucking fell out of the sky in the middle of the atlantic flying to france and it took them about a year to fucking find a plane and these happen a couple of months apart and everybody the same the same thing is what's happening with boeing i'm not saying that boeing isn't having problems i.

Sam:
[54:18]
Was gonna say like you're saying that you're saying there are a few places where okay maybe boeing's getting blamed for things that aren't really them but at the same time people have uncovered a whole lot of shit where boeing's just gotten lax on a bunch of stuff.

Ivan:
[54:34]
Oh oh they have i mean they have and and and then the one thing that happened this week which was i mean this was really sobering that apparently there was this one guy who was a quality inspector at boeing that had been a whistleblower and had been talking about this to to the feds about about the stuff that's going on. And the guy committed suicide.

You know, that was just, that was terrible.

Sam:
[55:06]
Yeah.

Ivan:
[55:07]
You know, but no, there is no doubt.

The one thing is that there is no doubt the scrutiny that Boeing is getting right now has been earned.

One thing that Boeing hasn't done is that they have had a recurrent, you know, reoccurring issues with this over the last few years.

and they have not properly addressed them.

Sam:
[55:32]
Okay?

Ivan:
[55:33]
And the issues are not design as much as manufacturing quality issues, okay?

That is the biggest problem that they are having right now. They can't ramp up production.

They have been stalled with like ramping, even though they have this huge backlog of planes, they have not been able to solve the issues.

They keep doing work and they keep having to fix and repair stuff because what keeps happening is they get these fuselages over in Washington State and then they go through them and, well, shit, there's all this stuff that's done wrong that now we have to rework.

work so if you're reworking shit because you can't do it right the first time then there's no way to ramp up production of anything all you've got is just you know it that's the kind of stuff that just in a manufacturing line is always an issue okay you want to try to get this shit done right the first time if all you're doing is like you're piling up you know i've seen this with car car manufacturers where, you know, oh, well, yeah, we're piling up about 100, 200, 300 of these, you know, every day that we have to go and like fix like 17 different things on each one because, you know, we can't do them right the first time.

Well, that's that's that's that's not a good way of manufacturing something.

And that's what's happening with been happening with Boeing consistently. And they haven't.

They switched management many years ago from there was a there was a person back in the 2000s that was their CEO.

They got hired by Ford, OK, got hired by Ford because he and he actually went to Ford and did a good job straightening out their manufacturing.

the fucking problem is that they haven't really i haven't seen boeing finally decide and say look we gotta get a somebody in here a fucking knows how to build shit and fix what the hell the problems are with our production or with our production lines okay they've just been dancing moving saying yeah whatever and they're not addressing the fucking problem well.

Sam:
[57:53]
And there There was a lot of denial going on, too.

Ivan:
[57:56]
Oh, denial and denial and denial. But my point is that, look, a door falling off a 20-year-old 737-800 has nothing to do with this, is what I'm saying.

Or a fucking wheel that failed on a 25-year-old 777 also has nothing to do with this.

and neither does a fucking flight attendant going and pushing the seat in the fucking cockpit, like making the guy's food tray go and like push the control stick also is not the, issue at hand, okay with any of these, okay and so that's my point with it it's just, you know, yeah those are not those are not the, symptoms of the problem at Boeing there's other.

Sam:
[58:44]
Yeah but even with the the rest of those you're like people getting really nervous about boeing planes you know with with some of the issues you've mentioned that are at boeing and you issued not a boeing issue but you've mentioned airlines being lax on maintenance between those two things is there any actual source of worry i.

Ivan:
[59:06]
I think i think i think that You know, look, I'm leery to say that airlines are lax on maintenance.

I do think that one thing that's happening is that because air travel demand has soared.

Airlines, you know, the pandemic, it caused a number of shifts.

Airlines had been at some point went and pushed back orders for aircraft.

And then all of a sudden they realized, shit, man, travel demand didn't really go down. We, we need, we need it.

And airlines all of a sudden went and unretired a lot of old planes.

Sam:
[59:45]
Okay.

Ivan:
[59:48]
A American, for example, I don't know because I fly American, I keep track of their fleet more, more, more closely.

I mean, they they had at one point grounded several hundred old 737s.

OK, basically, I think that right now of all the old 737s that they had that they had grounded, I think only one is in storage.

OK, they had to pull them all back out of retirement.

environment okay and put it back in because travel demand is so much and then because.

You got boeing struggling to make newer air new airplanes okay and i mean they've got airbus but the thing is that demand is far exceeding supply at at the moment and so i think that what what you're you know the main point i i i i watched this guy who is a triple seven pilot that has has he has a really good channel on youtube called is called blanco lirio b-l-a-n-c-o-l-i-r-i-o his name is one brown he's a triple seven pilot and he does a lot he talks a lot about a lot about these issues and goes in detail and explains what happened why this is an issue why not etc and one thing that he that he was talking about look the biggest problem that you've got is shit you know we're flying planes that are so much older than what we've been used to flying we've We've got, there are so many planes out there right now that are 20, 30 years old.

And if you think about it, look, we were back in the 90s.

A 30-year-old plane would have been a 707.

None of us were flying 707s back in the 1990s.

And literally right now, in many cases, we're flying 777-200s that were manufactured in the mid-90s.

No problem right now. Now we've got these planes out there now for 30 fucking years.

And now, by the way, the one thing that that I can say about you talk about how the quality of aircraft manufacturing is improved, improved so much over time.

Look, planes that were 15, 20, 30 years old back then used to be suffering a lot from structural fatigue, having issues in midflight.

Like, hell, man, I remember seeing planes that lost complete size of the planes, the roofs, parts, the shit like that.

Sam:
[1:02:07]
That Hawaii convertible plane.

Ivan:
[1:02:10]
Yes, an Aloha airplane that basically lost its entire fucking roof on a 737.

And that plane wasn't even as old as a lot of these planes that we've got flying around.

So I think that's why, you know, a 25-year-old plane all of a sudden had a bad wheel.

Yeah, that sucks. sucks but the one great thing about a triple seven also is that it's got one hell of a fucking landing gear with 16 wheels on it okay and so the reality is that because of the redundancy that's built into a lot of these planes lose it to one tire, It's not the end of the world, okay? You know, they have been made to be that robust, okay?

And that's why so many of them are flying right now without issue.

But yeah, airlines want to replace these.

But it's hard to get them. And plus, you got to remember that the airlines also got somewhat of a financial hold back in 2020, 2021 with a pandemic.

Sam:
[1:03:13]
Right.

Ivan:
[1:03:13]
I mean, a lot of them lost a lot of money. And so all of a sudden, they've got this demand that went and crashed and now is through the roof.

And now they're having to replace planes. So it's just been a very complicated, very complicated thing.

But but yeah, but I by no means I'm taking Boeing off the hook over all the fuck ups that they have done.

But my whole point is, yeah, don't think that because a panel fell off a 37, 8, 7, 3, 7, 800.

it was built 20 years ago that that's really a sign of what the hell's going on at boeing the signs are totally different the door plug that is right okay that that that definitely is okay but but not not all that other stuff well.

Sam:
[1:03:57]
I i just checked all my the four flights i took last week they were all airbus.

Ivan:
[1:04:01]
Oh there you go so yeah i mean i i mean i i will say i've flown on the max I actually like that damn plane.

It's very quiet, you know, because a lot of new stuff, you know, they've made that these planes are a lot.

They're a lot quieter in the cabin. That was the first thing that I really liked about it.

It's just that the engine noise on that plane is just a lot less than on the older aircraft. And it's very noticeable.

So, yeah, I mean, I've flown on the Max quite a few times already.

I even went on, some years back, I actually was on a Max flight that got canceled because of some mechanical issue.

We couldn't even leave the gate.

Sam:
[1:04:50]
So better than having the issue once you're in there.

Ivan:
[1:04:53]
Yes, indeed.

Sam:
[1:04:54]
So, okay. So I will suggest that we've been going along enough that we take a break before I pick my topic.

Ivan:
[1:05:02]
All right. Pick. Okay.

Sam:
[1:05:04]
You know me, I'm going to do like Trump legal crap. Cause like, Oh, okay.

Ivan:
[1:05:09]
I thought, I thought you were going to talk about the weather, but okay. All right.

Sam:
[1:05:14]
Well, you know, at least where I am right now, there hasn't really been any interesting weather lately. It's just been normal.

Ivan:
[1:05:22]
I saw that Denver was supposed to get like 18 inches of snow.

Sam:
[1:05:26]
Yeah. Denver got a bunch of snow this week. I think we, we, we had those some wind and maybe some rain, but like nothing, nothing like exciting.

Ivan:
[1:05:38]
Our, our, our, our on the ball weather report.

What's, what's the weather like? Well, got wind, got rain, got temperature.

It's all good. Back after this.

Sam:
[1:05:51]
At this very moment here near Everett, Washington, it is 48 degrees and clear.

Ivan:
[1:05:58]
Did we read the weather when we were at WRCT?

Sam:
[1:06:01]
Yes, we did.

Ivan:
[1:06:02]
Oh, yeah, we did. Yeah, we did.

Sam:
[1:06:08]
And tomorrow here in Everett, we're going to have a high of 69, low of 39.

Ivan:
[1:06:15]
Nice.

Sam:
[1:06:16]
Also clear. with no precipitation so okay wow.

Ivan:
[1:06:22]
There you go a very detailed weather report.

Sam:
[1:06:25]
That weather will be in the past by the time anybody listens to this oh so it's not going to be very useful well you know weather reports about the past are much more accurate than the ones about the future no.

Ivan:
[1:06:38]
Shit really well.

Sam:
[1:06:40]
It depends how far back you go like if i want to get a good report on like Like the weather on January 25th, 1325.

I don't know if I can have a good record of that. Now you might in certain cities.

Ivan:
[1:06:55]
You might in certain cities. You might.

Sam:
[1:06:57]
You might. You might. Like certain European cities kept good records going way back.

But like if I were to pick an arbitrary place on the planet and ask what the weather was 1300 years ago or something, I don't know how good an answer I can give.

Ivan:
[1:07:12]
I'm going to guess that in Tuva they didn't keep the weather records.

Sam:
[1:07:15]
Tanutuva. Yes, yes. Okay.

We're going to take a break. We will be back. I'll do all the, we'll talk about all the stupid Trump legal crap because there's been tons of it since the last time we talked about it.

Back after this.

Break:
[1:07:34]
You're supposed to say doo doo doo. Doo doo doo.

Alex Samsella. Alex Samsella is awesome.

Its videos are fun. And today, once again, we have one of our most loyal subscribers here to tell you how awesome Alex Zemzula is.

I'd say on a rate from 1 to 10, Alex Zemzula is awesome at, I don't know, 37, 82.

He's pretty radical. His videos are phenomenal. They're full of creativity.

And they're so funny and exciting to watch. Wow, what happened to your voice then, Amy?

Was that Dad pretending to be you because the audio was distorted when it really wasn't because I told him to?

Yes! Good job on remembering, Dad! Do, do, do!

Ivan:
[1:08:33]
The extended weather forecast for the Boca Raton area is tonight partly cloudy with a low around 70, south wind around 8 mph. per hour.

Saturday, partly sunny with a high near 86, southwest wind 5 to 10 miles per hour, becoming southeast of the afternoon.

Saturday night, mostly cloudy with a low around 71, south wind around 9 miles per hour.

Sunday, mostly sunny and with a high near 87, south wind 6 to 14 miles per hour with gusts as high as 21 miles per hour.

And Sunday night, mostly clear with a low around 72 south wind 9 to 11 miles per hour and now after your weather report back to curmudgeon's corner.

Sam:
[1:09:13]
There you go you know and i know this is one of the differences you and i have like that forecast to me like i hear that and i'm like oh my god that's so hot and on and uncomfortable and, like here the high is going to be 69 that's like perfect it's going to be in the 60s most of the the day with like it cooler in the fifties, like an evening and maybe even a little cooler. And that's like perfect.

And you're, you're like high 87. And I'm like, oh my God, I'd be melting. That's horrific.

Ivan:
[1:09:49]
It is, it is a little bit warmer than it's been here.

Now I will say that heading into next week, we're going to have lows dipping into the fifties again, the middle of the week with the highs in the mid seventies.

Sam:
[1:10:01]
Well, there you go.

Ivan:
[1:10:02]
You know, and that's the curmudgeon's corner weather report for an area that is nowhere near any of our listeners.

Sam:
[1:10:10]
You have no one in your vicinity that like listens to the show.

Ivan:
[1:10:14]
Actually, you know what? I, you know what? I stand corrected. There might be. Yes.

Sam:
[1:10:22]
I know we have listeners near me.

Ivan:
[1:10:26]
I think that I've seen in some instances where we've had listeners near here. or so.

Sam:
[1:10:32]
But now it is true, however, that there are listeners who are not in either of those two locations.

Ivan:
[1:10:38]
Now, of course, yes, and not just that, but that my weather forecast may be out of date.

Sam:
[1:10:43]
Oh, yes, it will be the past. Hey, if anyone else out there wants a weather forecast for your location, just let us know.

Ivan:
[1:10:50]
Let us know, and I'll read the weather forecast for your location during the Cormundus Corner podcast.

Sam:
[1:10:55]
Yes, absolutely. Oh, geez. Yeah. Okay.

I'm going to try to hit these in roughly chronological order for when they came up.

First of all, we, it's been a little while now, but we have not spoken about it.

The Supreme Court officially kept Trump on the ballot everywhere.

Ivan:
[1:11:16]
Yes.

Sam:
[1:11:17]
I think this was unsurprising and, you know, it was actually unanimous, but with a weird little consent, there was a disagreement that was surfaced.

And apparently it originally been a dissent. They forgot to remove the track changes or whatever from the Word doc, so people were able to see some history.

But apparently they made a deal to make it unanimous and did some negotiation or whatever.

But there was some disagreement on the scope. basically the conservative majority not only said that states can't do this, but also they said that only Congress can do this.

Whereas the liberal justices wanted to go along with the states can't do this, but wanted to stop right there because they wanted to retain like courts could do this under certain circumstances.

There might be other mechanisms other than straight up legislation, etc but i mean the the fundamental conclusion i think, yeah i mean you can't it was an untenable situation but.

Ivan:
[1:12:29]
There's another significant thing about this that they said there wasn't just that yes what they i think if i remember correctly what they did also say is that that clause does apply to the president yes which that was a point a contention and, people are like, oh, well, this doesn't cover the presidency, blah, blah, blah, but they made it pretty clear, oh, yes, it does.

Sam:
[1:12:52]
Yes, no, they did do that, but I think the place that is...

The idea that it's completely self-executing, okay, fine, but you have to have some sort of defined mechanism to determine, okay, is this particular person eligible or not?

And it can't be something that's just going to be randomly different on a state-by-state basis, or it can't even be something where whichever state gets to it first and pushes it through the court.

Ivan:
[1:13:23]
Yeah, I think that the main thing that they that they were asserting was that this was a federal.

This was this was supposed to be, you know, enforced at the federal.

Sam:
[1:13:36]
And also just after the Civil War, there actually was some implementing legislation around this.

It just expired at some point and was never renewed.

Oh, you know, I forget exactly the timetable, but a few decades after the Civil War, it was just allowed to expire.

because nobody thought it was really relevant anymore.

And the idea that you would have some congressional legislation to define how this is supposed to work is actually completely reasonable.

Ivan:
[1:14:07]
Yeah.

Sam:
[1:14:08]
Now, with our current Congress and the current history of what we're talking about here, there's no way in hell you would ever pass anything.

So this is the kind of- Well, well, well. This is the kind of legislation that ideally you pass decades before it becomes an actual issue.

You know, no, I agree.

Ivan:
[1:14:32]
But but I will say that. Look, depending on.

You know, it really depends on an election where one party gets.

House and Senate and one of them finally decides to do away with a filibuster.

Sam:
[1:14:48]
Well, and you know, we did pass the Electoral Count Act reform.

In the last few years, that happened.

Ivan:
[1:14:57]
Yes, we did.

Sam:
[1:14:57]
On a bipartisan basis. And it happened by going under the radar.

It didn't get a lot of attention.

A bipartisan group sort of worked on it and got it through and eliminated a lot of the loopholes that Trump was trying to explode. Explode. Exploit.

Ivan:
[1:15:15]
Exploit. Well, explode. Yeah. Exploit. Exploit. Exploit. Yeah. Works for me.

Sam:
[1:15:21]
Yeah, exactly. But this is the kind of thing where right now, you know, like if they were going to take up legislation on this, everyone knows the purpose of it is to deal with people who were involved in January 6th, whether it be the president, certain senators and congressmen, or just the people who were involved.

Cause like what, one thing that was pointed out by the way, is this isn't just about Donald Trump, right?

This is like all of these folks who are like people who are in jail for January 6th activities right now, I guarantee you are going to get out of jail and run for Congress.

Ivan:
[1:16:03]
Yep. Yep. No, no, totally.

Sam:
[1:16:06]
And, and, and so this kind of thing would potentially apply there too.

But basically, you know, SCOTUS said, you know, Congress has to do something.

And as long as they don't, then, you know, it's just not nothing's happening there. And I honestly, again, A lot of people were really upset about this, but at the same time, this is the reasonable way to deal with it.

Like having, having the sort of free for all wasn't what.

Ivan:
[1:16:36]
What, listen, going back to the legislation and the, and the, and, and, and the origins, what are the things about this?

And I don't think that anybody reasonable could dispute this was that when this was done, it wasn't meant for the States to have that power.

Sam:
[1:16:53]
Right never.

Ivan:
[1:16:54]
This i mean it was totally the opposite this was meant to be at the federal level.

Sam:
[1:17:00]
Well and part of it was it was to protect this you know they didn't want takeovers of state or federal government by former confederates and like of course exactly if you left it up to the states of course they would be happy with that because like exactly the former confederates wanted to take back over exactly so exactly.

Ivan:
[1:17:20]
So so that's part of it i mean i don't think that you could really argue against the uh i mean if i don't think anybody that reasonably looks at what what they wrote and the background unto how this came to be you can say that what they did was an unreasonable decision.

Sam:
[1:17:40]
Now i i kind of agree with the liberal justices that i wish they hadn't said that Congress has to be the decider.

Cause I think there's a reasonable place to say that in some certain circumstances, the courts could be, but it is what it is.

Ivan:
[1:17:56]
It is what it is. And, and, and, and, you know, but, but the main thrust of it, I think it's hard to argue with the, there's, I don't have any good arguments against it.

Sam:
[1:18:07]
And like I predicted on our prediction show, there was no way in fucking hell, well this supreme court was going to disqualify donald trump from the ballot.

Ivan:
[1:18:18]
But look the reality is that it wasn't even like if you look at if you look at it not even i know it was unanimous justice it was unanimous so yeah so anyway all right so that next okay.

Sam:
[1:18:35]
Next up next up next up Donald Trump actually put up his bond on the E.

Jean Carroll case the 91 and.

Ivan:
[1:18:46]
Then libeled her again.

Sam:
[1:18:48]
And then libeled her again and the bond was backed by Chubb I guess like insurance company and this.

Ivan:
[1:18:59]
Program had been made with a donation by the Chubb group if you ever listen to, pds that was a very common.

Sam:
[1:19:09]
Well i i i remember going back further the the mutual of omaha like nature shows well but i don't actually remember the chub one.

Ivan:
[1:19:19]
Oh you don't remember the chub one oh yeah that one was like yeah.

Sam:
[1:19:23]
Anyway so this is this is of course the smaller of the two he's got like nearly half a billion he has to come up with in the next week and a half or so but people were people weren't sure he was even going to be able to come up with a 92 billion million not billion i wish.

Ivan:
[1:19:41]
It was billion but.

Sam:
[1:19:42]
92 million for this one but he did well.

Ivan:
[1:19:46]
He didn't come up with with 92 billion let's be clear okay all right let's be clear he did.

Sam:
[1:19:51]
Right he oh hey he can't he got the bond for 92 he he arrayed the nut so.

Ivan:
[1:19:57]
So in order to secure the a bond, so it was look, that bond had to be the fee was 10% in cash to the insurance company. Okay?

Sam:
[1:20:08]
So that's about $9.2 million.

Ivan:
[1:20:10]
$9.2 million, but at the same time, he had to post collateral to the insurance company for the rest.

So some property which he could show had whatever value and less of debt had that value had to be, had to be put put up in order to to secure the bond.

Sam:
[1:20:33]
Well there there there are a couple of things here though like because as we discussed there's no transparency on how he did that like that has that does not have to be disclosed there's.

Ivan:
[1:20:45]
No transparency but that's the way about listen this was no.

Sam:
[1:20:49]
No no no but but i mean we can't find out what collateral was put up oh.

Ivan:
[1:20:54]
No yeah which Which property he put up? Yeah, we don't know.

No, we don't know which one.

Sam:
[1:20:58]
And also people brought up the possibility that, you know, someone else could have co-signed too. And we don't know that either.

Ivan:
[1:21:07]
True. I mean, possible. I mean, somebody could have put up the, somebody else could have put up the collateral, the property collateral. Possible.

Sam:
[1:21:15]
Exactly.

Ivan:
[1:21:16]
Still, here's the reality. You still got to come up with another half a billion dollars. In the next few weeks.

Sam:
[1:21:25]
You're going to be donating that to him, right?

Ivan:
[1:21:27]
Yep. I'm going to be lining up to donate to the billionaire.

Sam:
[1:21:30]
Pull out your wallet. Just give it to him in cash.

Ivan:
[1:21:34]
And let's put it this way. The 10% forget about, you know, this was 10 million, 10%.

He's going to get a bond. 10% is 50 million in cash.

Sam:
[1:21:43]
Right.

Ivan:
[1:21:44]
You know, it's 50 million in cash and he has to produce something worth 400, you know, something that can show net equity of 400 plus million dollars.

Sam:
[1:21:54]
Have we heard any more rumors beyond what we talked about two weeks ago in terms of how he might actually swing this?

Ivan:
[1:22:00]
No, no, it's a.

Sam:
[1:22:01]
It's just all black box right now.

Ivan:
[1:22:04]
Yeah. Yeah.

Sam:
[1:22:05]
And so we're, we're, we'll see. I mean, that it's ticking. Like we, we got what his deadlines in nine days, I think.

Ivan:
[1:22:13]
Yep.

Sam:
[1:22:15]
So, we'll see what happens. I mean, we may just get, like, the 92 for E.

Jean Carroll, it was just like one afternoon, it was like, okay, bond has been placed.

Like, we didn't have any warning other than the deadline was approaching, and we didn't have any details other than bond has happened and it was chubbed. That's it.

And so, that may well happen again.

Ivan:
[1:22:43]
Now, my question, well, I didn't see if collection proceedings had been stalled by this.

Sam:
[1:22:57]
Yes.

Ivan:
[1:22:58]
Okay.

Sam:
[1:22:59]
The whole point of this is that he put this up to enable him.

Ivan:
[1:23:03]
No, because I've seen cases where even though they haven't stopped them, but I was assuming that in this case they did.

Sam:
[1:23:14]
Yeah. Now, my understanding is since he has put up this bond, he now has a certain amount of time to actually do the appeal, to initiate the appeal.

and in the meantime there's no collections until the appeals work their way through the entire process which may take years but he's put up the money so theoretically like if he loses at the end of that process the money just gets paid like well.

Ivan:
[1:23:46]
The money gets paid right now the bond the bond company would be on the.

Sam:
[1:23:49]
Hook exactly like.

Ivan:
[1:23:50]
Right now yeah.

Sam:
[1:23:51]
Yeah basically so and.

Ivan:
[1:23:53]
They would would be able to collect on the collateral.

Sam:
[1:23:57]
Yes. Absolutely. So, we'll see what happens on that. Okay, next up...

We got two things on the Georgia trial. So let's do the smaller one first that happened chronologically earlier.

The judge dropped six of the charges.

Ivan:
[1:24:17]
Right.

Sam:
[1:24:18]
Basically saying it's too vague.

You didn't specify exactly how the people committed the crime.

And I believe two of these were for Trump himself. The other four related to other people.

and they related to a couple of different things, but the biggest one was there was a charge about trying to entice officials to break their oaths of office.

And basically what the judge said is you haven't specified exactly how they were going to break their oath of office.

you know you you it was very general you didn't like yeah and we need we need detail we need to say they asked them to do this which violated this clause of their oath because xyz you know and now this was done in such a way that the these charges can potentially be made again Right.

He dismissed them in such a way that said.

Ivan:
[1:25:22]
You're going to refile them.

Sam:
[1:25:23]
You can refile these. However, refiling them would mean re-impaneling a grand jury, going through that whole process again.

That would by itself take many, many months. So one of the questions, you know, the prosecution has a few options.

One, they could appeal this and say, like, dismissing these was wrong.

We want that reversed on appeal. And that would take some time.

Or they could say, OK, fine, we'll refile these charges.

But that's going to take a lot of time as they go through the grand jury process all over again.

And you remember that took a really long time the first time around.

Ivan:
[1:26:06]
I've been waiting for this for years, for God's sakes.

Sam:
[1:26:08]
Yeah. Or they could just say, you know, that's okay. We'll go forward without those six.

And I've heard some of the legal talking heads say that might be good anyway.

It's going to streamline things, make it easier to get this thing done.

It was really big and really sprawling to start with.

Getting rid of a few of these isn't a big deal.

And the big one, the RICO charge at the center of this is not one of the things that got tossed out.

And even like, you know, a lot of these enticing people to break their oaths or whatever were related to like that phone call that everybody knows where Trump was asking for such and such number of votes.

That's not thrown out itself. That can still be evidence towards the other charges, even if there's not a charge specifically on that. And so...

If I had to bet, they're just going to go forward anyway.

Ivan:
[1:27:06]
Yeah, I think that's what makes more sense right now.

Sam:
[1:27:12]
Okay, moving on and we'll get back to Georgia in just one second.

But first, there's some fuckery on the New York trial.

The New York trial was due to start on the 25th of this month and we were all like talking. And this is, looks like the only one that's actually guaranteed to start and start on a timely fashion. And it's coming right up.

And then just in the last couple of days, the Southern district of New York, which is like, this is a, this is a state case.

The Southern district of New York is a federal office. They, they do not have anything directly to do with this case, except apparently over Over a year ago, the New York Attorney General had asked SDNY for a whole bunch of documents related to their investigation of Cohen to make sure they had all the relevant information, related to this case, and SDNY had not given it to them.

And then in January, Donald Trump subpoenaed for these same things, thinking, hey, if they they got a bunch of stuff on Cohen.

It's got to include a bunch of stuff where Cohen was doing something shady, illegal shit, because like, that's what he did for Trump back in the day.

And it's got to include stuff where Cohen lied.

And this is going to be things that we can use against Cohen in the trial to impeach him as a witness, et cetera. So this is going to be relevant to us.

And since January, uh.

Apparently, SDNY told Trump's folks a couple of times, we need more time.

And Trump said, sure, you could have more time because why wouldn't you?

You know, and this happened a couple of times. So just this week, SDNY is in the process of dumping. They haven't even finished yet.

Apparently, they said they're going to finish tomorrow or something.

Ivan:
[1:29:08]
It was like, I thought it was like a, it was like a ton of stuff.

Sam:
[1:29:11]
Stuff it's over a hundred thousand pages of stuff and they they gave it to the prosecutor the and and to trump's folks i guess i guess i don't know if it goes through the prosecutor to trump whatever it they both get it in the end and it's a hundred thousand pages worth of stuff and understandably trump's lawyers are like we need time to look at this and even the new york attorney general is like, yeah, we need, we need time to look at it too.

Perfectly reasonable. And the, the, the, the, the prosecutor is like, we think 30 days is fine for this. The Trump folks are like.

Ivan:
[1:29:53]
Oh, we need three years.

Sam:
[1:29:56]
They actually asked for 90 days, but 30 days, but, but in any case, so this trial that was going to start nine days from now, as we're recording, has now been delayed at least 30 days on March 25th when the trial when the jury selection and all that was going to start instead they are going to have a conference with the prosecution and the defense to basically decide on how much of a delay to put in here that would be fair for all involved to look at a hundred thousand pages of this crap and decide what's relevant and what's not.

And apparently from all reports, like it's 99% plus irrelevant.

But there are some relevant bits in here that, you know, are potentially both good for the prosecution or in some cases good for the defense.

So there's relevant stuff in here. And like, I think the big question, and I've heard some people talking about like, is this a big screw up by SDNY?

And my gut feel is this is not a screw up. They did this on purpose.

Ivan:
[1:31:11]
They have been problematic.

Sam:
[1:31:13]
Problematic sdny has been problematic they have over the last x number of years there have been multiple incidents where it looks like they were slow rolling stuff to help trump yeah yeah or they were doing various other things that just looked like they had you know an interest in which way way things turned out so i don't know maybe it was an innocent screw up by somebody but honestly it looks like to me it looks like somebody should be digging into what the hell is going on on in sdny and did somebody intentionally say hey when's the most useful time we can dump these docs how about one week before the fucking trial the.

Ivan:
[1:32:04]
Trial starts yeah i know.

Sam:
[1:32:05]
Or one and a half half weeks, whatever it is. So we got that one delayed at least 30 days, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's delayed 60 or more, like, because, you know, the judge is going to want to be fair.

The judge is going to say, you know, the Trump folks are saying we need a more time that he's going to try to split the difference or something.

And, you know, one side says 30, one says 90.

Okay, fine. Let's do 60. You know, I don't know, but 45.

Forty five.

Ivan:
[1:32:36]
Well, it's not half. I mean, it's half.

Sam:
[1:32:38]
Sixty is half between 30 and nine.

Ivan:
[1:32:40]
No, 60. I know. Yeah, I know.

Sam:
[1:32:42]
I, you know, at first I, when I was thinking about this, the 45 was the first number that came into my ad.

And then it took me a while. And I'm like, wait, 45 isn't halfway between 30 and 45 is halfway between 30 and 60. But that's different.

Ivan:
[1:33:00]
You're correct. I'm correct, sir.

Sam:
[1:33:03]
You know math is hard some math is yeah i mean if we were talking to like trigonometry or something that's a whole other story some calculus but you ask me to like tell you what two.

Ivan:
[1:33:17]
Plus two is.

Sam:
[1:33:17]
The number is halfway between two other numbers you know i.

Ivan:
[1:33:22]
Know i know.

Sam:
[1:33:23]
Don't even get me started on like the sevens multiplication tables like i'm like what's seven times eight who the fuck knows how are you 56 for god's.

Ivan:
[1:33:36]
Sakes i mean what the hell.

Sam:
[1:33:37]
How do you know this this is like crazy stuff now.

Ivan:
[1:33:43]
I don't know why the hell i know all of this but you know my wife keeps being always stunned by my you know ability to do arithmetic like really quickly with like Like.

Sam:
[1:33:53]
I definitely have holes in my, like in the multiplication tables, you're supposed to learn in the first few grades of life.

Ivan:
[1:34:01]
Yeah. Yeah. Holes. All right.

Sam:
[1:34:04]
You know, like there's some, I know, I know two times three. It's not nine, right?

Ivan:
[1:34:08]
It's not nine.

Sam:
[1:34:10]
Well, fuck, you know, anyway, no, I know, I know what two times three is.

It's six. It is, it is six.

Ivan:
[1:34:17]
It is six.

Sam:
[1:34:17]
But there are certain of the, you know, two numbers, both with single digits.

that i would have to start counting on my fingers yeah so.

Ivan:
[1:34:26]
You know the ones right i mean you know that that multiplication table i.

Sam:
[1:34:31]
Can handle the ones i can handle the one i'm also good at multiplying by zero that's also well.

Ivan:
[1:34:37]
That's that's that's okay.

Sam:
[1:34:38]
That's yeah.

Ivan:
[1:34:39]
You know the zero table.

Sam:
[1:34:40]
Okay i know the zero table i know okay great the zero table.

Ivan:
[1:34:43]
Into one table damn it we've got some ground covered.

Sam:
[1:34:46]
And i'm actually okay with nines because there's a little trick to it because the two digits add up to nine but like but you you get me started like sevens are the worst sevens are the worst and there are a few others that are bad you know anyway okay enough about that the juicy one and this is the last one i have on my list for right now a.

Ivan:
[1:35:09]
Juicy juicy juicy.

Sam:
[1:35:14]
I thought you were going to do like the Juicy Fruit jingle.

Ivan:
[1:35:18]
No, there's another song I had. Anyway, no.

Sam:
[1:35:24]
Anyway, no, this is, of course, the Fonny Willis stuff. So the judge came back with his decision.

He says Fonny Willis is not disqualified.

Well, he said, look, if you look, there is no actual conflict of interest here.

That level is not set, so I'm not going to disqualify Fannie Willis.

However, there's all kinds of appearance of conflict of interest issues, and those can be remedied either by Fannie Willis and her office removing themselves from the case or get rid of Wade.

right and so wade resigned resignation accepted so we should be moving forward on this there have been some suggestions by certain people that you know willis should remove herself anyway or at least take a back seat and let her staff handle most things there's been talk about how.

Willis is like damaged in terms of you know even finding jury pools and stuff because people will have heard about this stuff and the judge say, look, I'm not disqualifying her, but this is clearly an area where all of these other organizations should take a look or could take a look.

The state assembly in Georgia could take a look, the state bar, there's an ethics board and of course here's another thing both fanny willis and this judge are up for re-election this year too god grief so what the fuck happens if one or both of them loses oh god that anyway and and look there have been a lot of complaints like he he should have just said okay there was was no actual conflict of interest.

We're not taking her off. End of story, done.

But he did not stop there. He went on to the edge. He said that he went on to the rest.

He said that there is an odor of mendacity still around us. So I think clearly where...

Ivan:
[1:37:41]
An odor of mendacity.

Sam:
[1:37:43]
Yes, that was his phrase.

Ivan:
[1:37:45]
I like that.

Sam:
[1:37:47]
But I mean, clearly where he was coming down is that what the defense was trying to argue that there was a financial conflict of interest here.

And the reason Fonny Willis was doing all of this was to hire her boyfriend and make herself money through him paying for vacations. That that was a load of bullshit.

Ivan:
[1:38:09]
But, but, but that still didn't remove the appearance of impropriety. And so that's why.

Sam:
[1:38:17]
Well, but not only the appearance of impropriety, I think he fairly clearly indicated that he thought both Willis and Wade lied on the stand about their relationship.

Ivan:
[1:38:28]
Yeah, it is. Okay.

Sam:
[1:38:30]
And honestly, having listened to most of that exchange, I'm not sure I believe that they didn't have a relationship before he was hired either.

Like, Wade clearly seemed like he was hiding stuff in every single answer he gave.

Willis seemed a little bit more straightforward about things.

But still, even in her answers, I was not 100% convinced that there was not something going on before he was hired.

And that maybe shouldn't be the standard. But at the same time, they were under oath being asked about it.

And I feel like there's something going on here that relates to his divorce and the timing. and were they having an affair before the he and the wife were separated blah blah blah look and i listen.

Ivan:
[1:39:27]
I the whole damn thing is simpler.

Sam:
[1:39:31]
Look yeah you.

Ivan:
[1:39:35]
Don't you don't have a, relationship with somebody that you're hiring to your employee.

Sam:
[1:39:42]
Duh duh whether it's before or after doesn't matter it doesn't matter if you already have a relationship then you sure as fuck don't hire them no if if you hire them first and then you start a relationship you first of all you don't start the relationship ideally but if you are going to then you sever the business relationship relationship exactly you know or at the or at the very least at the very least you disclose you.

Ivan:
[1:40:12]
Need to tell you need to tell everybody.

Sam:
[1:40:14]
Yes and.

Ivan:
[1:40:14]
That's the other thing i mean okay there are a whole bunch of options that were acceptable and they didn't do any of them.

Sam:
[1:40:23]
Right right and so you know we've talked about this before and a lot of other people have too this is 100 self-inflicted wounds here oh totally like the the the fact you know exactly when it started aside it's pretty clear it.

Ivan:
[1:40:45]
Doesn't fucking matter.

Sam:
[1:40:46]
Yeah i mean they knew they knew they were taking on the fucking ex-president of the united states like.

Ivan:
[1:40:55]
Like yeah like nobody was is going to find out about this. I mean, the fucking hubris about it. It's just absurd.

Sam:
[1:41:02]
I mean, this trial was going to be one of the most watched in American history.

You know, because unlike the other three trials we're talking about, this one was going to be on fucking TV.

Ivan:
[1:41:12]
Right.

Sam:
[1:41:13]
You know, like there was going to be so much attention on this.

I know I'm repeating stuff we've said in previous weeks, but when you're in this kind of situation, situation you have to be perfect and that may not be fair but.

Ivan:
[1:41:29]
That's a reality.

Sam:
[1:41:30]
But you have to do you have to do everything by the fucking book you can't give any little excuse for them to do this kind of shit like, You have lost the head prosecutor because of this nonsense, but also you've lost like two, two and a half months of time on the calendar as well.

Ivan:
[1:41:54]
On this on this horseshit look i i i am in an elected position as president of this condo war and i spent years in litigation with with a gentleman who uh he was honestly he was he was a mini trump okay real estate guy new york shady as all hell okay.

And this guy, you know, the same problem as Trump.

Nobody would take his case because he was a terrible client.

He kept, I mean, every time I send a letter, every lawyer would fire him because they're like, look, you're trying to sue.

You have no good reason to sue.

Go away. way but one thing i knew for sure was in my mind for any dealing that we had that could potentially, be an issue i was like you know i i always tried to do the right thing but i was like erring i was being even more cautious than normal because of the exposure of this situation okay and and And that's the thing that just baffles me because you're going, like you said, to prosecute fucking Donald Trump and the level of attention you're going to get is out of control.

And I'm just like, how the fuck could you think that this was not going to be found out?

Sam:
[1:43:33]
Right. And apparently even in her last campaign, like her predecessor in this spot got in trouble for some sexual harassment issues.

Ivan:
[1:43:42]
And she explicitly.

Sam:
[1:43:43]
In the campaign talked about how she would never get involved with somebody in her office.

Ivan:
[1:43:49]
Yeah fuck well well okay to be fair he wasn't in her office.

Sam:
[1:43:54]
I know she was making that distinction too he wasn't an employee he was a contractor whatever the fuck come on.

Ivan:
[1:44:04]
That's right yeah but but yeah it's not still dumb but but yeah but but i mean it is a it is is an important distinction okay you know in this case it doesn't matter but in most yes cases i mean if i hire an attorney okay and i don't know for some reason we you know so yeah you know i i you know i wind up in some kind of relationship with the attorney i mean it doesn't really matter.

Sam:
[1:44:33]
Because it's not quite the same as an employee.

Ivan:
[1:44:35]
Exactly.

Sam:
[1:44:36]
It's a more of an equal exchange relationship.

Ivan:
[1:44:39]
Correct. Yes.

Sam:
[1:44:40]
Okay.

Ivan:
[1:44:41]
Still.

Sam:
[1:44:41]
But anyway.

Ivan:
[1:44:44]
Still bad. Still bad. But anyway.

Sam:
[1:44:46]
Yeah. So. Yeah.

With all of this stuff, like, I mean, I think our, you know, when at our prediction show, I think both Yvonne and I predicted that two of the four would actually get to trial in this year. year i think i.

Ivan:
[1:45:02]
Think we're still two.

Sam:
[1:45:05]
I i think if i had to bet now i would be probably slipping down towards one two is still possible two is still possible or.

Ivan:
[1:45:14]
Early it's still march.

Sam:
[1:45:16]
That's true that's true but we got this you know i the the other one we haven't talked about the dc trial this time because it hasn't been much new but we're waiting on scotus there right and And SCOTUS may not, like, they're going to not have the hearings for a while yet, I think in April sometime.

And then they don't have to give their decision on that till maybe June.

And they have the option. If I had to bet right now, I'd say what SCOTUS will do on the immunity case is say, instead Instead of saying the whole idea is nonsense, throw it out, they will instead put together some sort of guidelines on when there is presidential immunity and when there is not, and send it back to the lower court judge to then decide based on those new guidelines whether immunity applies in this case, adding additional delay and pushing that one past the election, and past this year probably too.

That would that would be my guess right now but maybe maybe like the the fast case scenario is that they actually come back with a decision that says no this immunity stuff is bullshit we just wanted to be the ones who say so and they do it relatively quickly and get something back in may and then full speed ahead on the dc trial too but we'll we'll see so far all this delay delay delay stuff is working.

Ivan:
[1:46:53]
What about the case down here, Florida?

Sam:
[1:46:58]
Oh, well, they had some arguments about that.

They had a hearing this week about timing on that.

The prosecution wants...

July, I believe as a date there. And I had originally said on the show a couple of weeks ago that the defense had proposed August.

That's not quite right. They, they had proposed never or next year, but they said, if you really must do something no earlier than August.

and so judge cannon has yet to like come stay in an actual day the trump has argued there that this one needs to wait for that uh supreme court decision on immunity as well he's actually put in on all four trials he has put in motions that says it should wait for the supreme court to rule on immunity before anything gets scheduled further so we'll see how that works on all of them him.

Like in the New York one, he put that argument in, but a few months ago, he'd actually explicitly said that he wasn't going to make that argument.

So we shall see what the judge does there.

But Cannon, of course, is the one who is well known for giving the Trump folks lots of delays.

There was one thing where there was a motion to dismiss due to vagueness, similar to of what we talked about on the Georgia case, but Trump had argued that the espionage law was vague in certain circumstances.

Cannon said, no, I'm not going to dismiss this based on that.

And so some of the initial reports were like, hey, this is a victory for the prosecution because she's not dismissing that.

However, when people started talking a little bit more deeply about it, She did not say that that argument was bullshit. She said...

This is the wrong time to make that argument. You can make that argument during trial.

And so the thing is, if you bring that same argument during trial and then she dismisses it because of that, then Jeopardy is attached.

Anything that happens now, Jeopardy is not attached yet.

Once the trial actually starts, then Jeopardy is attached. And if the case is dismissed, it's dismissed for good.

Now, there are some things that like, you know, the Justice Department could have or the special counsel could have held in reserve.

If you remember, there were hundreds and hundreds of documents and they only charged some of them.

Ivan:
[1:49:50]
But that's what I was going to say. Correct.

Sam:
[1:49:53]
So if something like that happens, theoretically, the special counsel could re-indict based on a different set of documents.

Ivan:
[1:50:04]
Correct.

Sam:
[1:50:05]
But that would essentially be starting the whole process all over again.

And by this time, we're definitely talking next year. And of course, everything at that point depends on who wins the fucking election.

Ivan:
[1:50:18]
Right.

Sam:
[1:50:19]
So, anyway. I think that's it.

Ivan:
[1:50:24]
Okay. All right.

Sam:
[1:50:26]
Now, now, Yvonne, I think we've gone long enough. We can just be done.

Ivan:
[1:50:30]
Okay.

Sam:
[1:50:31]
Unless you have something else. If you, if you have something else you're eager to talk about, let's take a quick break and you can talk about it.

Ivan:
[1:50:36]
Let me, let me see. The thing is that we were kind of thin and light on, on some things.

Sam:
[1:50:43]
We got the, her interview transcript. We got the Tik TOK band stuff.

We got pants, Pence, not endorsing Biden.

Ivan:
[1:50:51]
Yeah. Yeah. Yeah, charge, Trump, New York. We got everything. So, yeah, no, we.

Sam:
[1:50:56]
Got IVF stuff going back a little further. You know, we it's been four years since the pandemic started.

You know, we got all kinds of but, you know, but.

Ivan:
[1:51:05]
I think no, I think I think we're I think we're done. OK, yeah.

Sam:
[1:51:12]
So, well, in that case, I will note one more thing.

Ivan:
[1:51:15]
One more thing.

Sam:
[1:51:17]
Last week.

I don't know if anybody noticed a difference, but when I was on the road, I recorded with one of the little mini mics that I got Yvonne. I got one for myself.

Ivan:
[1:51:29]
Oh, fuck me.

Sam:
[1:51:31]
And I used that last week.

Ivan:
[1:51:33]
You sounded great. You sounded great. No, you sounded great.

Sam:
[1:51:37]
And I liked it. I liked it. It was good. I enjoyed it. And, but Yvonne has lost his.

Ivan:
[1:51:44]
I, I, I gotta find it.

Sam:
[1:51:49]
You know, the thing is, though, I had mentioned two weeks ago that I wanted to have one of these for the trip, but buying one by itself, it wasn't going to arrive on time.

In order to get one that arrived on time, I had to get it in a bundle with a little mini tripod thing.

Ivan:
[1:52:10]
Oh.

Sam:
[1:52:11]
Now, it's a nice mini tripod. It, like, costs just as much as the microphone.

So it was, like, double the cost. lost but i i didn't i didn't actually need this tripod right now but now i have and now.

Ivan:
[1:52:24]
You have a little tripod yeah.

Sam:
[1:52:26]
This is like the little kind of tripod with a holder for your phone and like i've had little tripods with a holder for my phone before but frankly none of them were this nice this is a nice heavy solid one yeah well.

Ivan:
[1:52:41]
Of course the one thing is that i don't know what What did you, did you, wait, did you record using what exactly?

Because I had difficulties trying to get that microphone to work with the phone.

Sam:
[1:52:53]
Oh, I did it on a laptop.

Ivan:
[1:52:55]
Okay. You did it on the laptop. Okay.

Sam:
[1:52:56]
All right. Don't, don't, don't tell anybody at work, but I used my work laptop.

Ivan:
[1:53:00]
So it's secret safe with me.

Sam:
[1:53:03]
Yeah. Yeah. But yeah, no, I use it with the laptop and I, I clipped it onto my shirt and it worked really well. I liked it. So.

Ivan:
[1:53:11]
All right.

Sam:
[1:53:12]
Right anyway someday yvonne will find his again or i guess we'll buy him a new one but you know, okay so the stuff at the end of the show that we always do to see the archives of the show see how to contact us all that kind of stuff go to curmudgeons-corner.com and you know use the links there to like send us messages we like messages also there's a link to our patreon that you can use to send us money we like money too oh.

Ivan:
[1:53:43]
Yeah we we like money.

Sam:
[1:53:45]
Money money's cool yes yeah and yeah if if if you have an extra 500 million lying around just send it to us we're good you know we'll.

Ivan:
[1:53:56]
We'll take care of it.

Sam:
[1:53:58]
We will take care of it for you we.

Ivan:
[1:54:00]
Will totally take care of it don't worry about it.

Sam:
[1:54:02]
Yeah we're good we we not a problem not.

Ivan:
[1:54:06]
A problem not a problem.

Sam:
[1:54:07]
Anyway on the patreon at various levels well below 500 million dollars we will mention you on the show we will rig a bell we will send you a postcard we will send you a mug all that kind of fun stuff and importantly at two dollars a month or more or if you contact us in any of the ways on curmudgeons-corner.com and ask us we will invite you to the curmudgeons corner slack where yvonne and i and various of our listeners are hanging out throughout the week sharing news news links, talking about stuff, and just hanging out.

So, Yvonne, and the more of you join us, the more fun it is. So please join.

So, Yvonne, what is something from the Curmudgeon's Corner Slack this week that we have not mentioned on the show at all? And...

will be really exciting and make people want to join.

Ivan:
[1:55:01]
Oh, totally exciting. Okay. He claimed diplomatic immunity as cops arrested him in his $200,000 car. That didn't fly.

After a woman was released from a Miami-Dade County jail over driving with a fake diplomatic tag, Sunny Isles Beach cops said they arrested her driver on Wednesday for the same offense, this time drawing their guns.

Andres Lopez Escobar, 22.

was driving a 2022 Mercedes-Benz Maybach, a car that sells for nearly $200,000, in the 300 block of Sunny Isles Boulevard around 1.30 p.m.

when officers spotted its counterfeit diplomatic license plate, according to his arrest report.

With him was 32-year-old Cecilia Selena Mercado, who had been released earlier Wednesday from jail on a $2,500 bond after claiming she had diplomatic immunity, and an officer yanked her from her Audi.

It turns out that she did not have diplomatic immunity. Rather, she says she is an American state national, an ideology whose followers, some of whom are QAnon adherents, claim they're not citizens of a government they perceive as illegitimate.

According to the ADL, an organization that tracks extremists.

So there you go. Sam, that's beautiful.

American state national.

I think that's the way to go. And we get.

Sam:
[1:56:28]
Sort of like those sovereign citizen things.

Ivan:
[1:56:31]
Yes, yes, yes, yes. So an American state national, we need to get the diplomatic plates.

Sam:
[1:56:37]
I saw a video not that long ago on TikTok, the soon to be banned TikTok of some lady being pulled over at a traffic stop and claiming that they couldn't do it because she was a sovereign citizen or whatever.

Ivan:
[1:56:51]
Uh huh.

Sam:
[1:56:52]
Let me just say it don't work.

Ivan:
[1:56:54]
It doesn't work.

Sam:
[1:56:56]
They did it anyway they they pulled her out of that fucking car and they arrested her and then she was done but the whole time she was like i'm a sovereign citizen your laws have nothing on me whatever yeah sorry your ass went to jail yeah.

Ivan:
[1:57:12]
Yeah i i used to follow somebody on to unshitter that that basically their work at the courthouse over here in palm palm beach county and what they had assigned to her and it was like she hated it was a fucking sovereign sentence and violence and she was just like and it happened like regularly and she was just like these fucking assholes i hate them all.

Sam:
[1:57:33]
Anyway oh yeah okay well i think we're done yvonne we're done okay so hey as i always say have fun but not too fun not too, exactly have have fun but not too much fun stay safe have a good week we'll talk to you next time goodbye bye.

By the way, I'll just mention that on, there was a Riverside Facebook group and I answered a poll about having issues with the, the sound media board thing and it like not working with us.

And like I said, yes, I have that problem too.

And someone from Riverside support contacted me directly on Facebook and was like, can you describe your problem?

Blah, blah, blah. And I'm like, yeah, actually I'd already had a support ticket on it and they gave me something completely unhelpful listed stuff i already tried and all that but like you know thanks and they were like oh okay well thanks blah blah blah but it's been a month now and it has not happened again since then oh.

Ivan:
[1:59:12]
There you go okay.

Sam:
[1:59:13]
So i don't know if they upgraded their software or what but yeah so good and of course now that i've mentioned this to you it's going to fail completely next next time this.

Ivan:
[1:59:23]
Will oh it's gonna yes because.

Sam:
[1:59:26]
That's how it works that's.

Ivan:
[1:59:28]
How it works.

Sam:
[1:59:28]
Okay bye hitting stop bye.

Ivan:
[1:59:32]
All right stop.

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